Roots of Education

Although the preparation of teachers was not a stated objective of the university at its establishment, Texas A&M has been involved in teacher education from the very beginning.

At the turn of the 20th century, support for Normal Schools to train individuals for teaching in public schools slowly grows in popularity across the state.

While A&M College is not a formal location for a year-round school, in 1900, a bulletin entitled “Summer School and Summer Normal School” is issued to train high school graduates for teaching in public schools on the A&M campus.

In 1904, a new faculty member in the Department of Horticulture, E. J. Kyle, begins to call for better training for agricultural and vocational teachers across the state. Six years later, he becomes dean of the School of Agriculture and teaches the first course in Agricultural Education in 1911. A teacher certification course is created in 1913.

The Vocational Education Act of 1917 provides federal funding for agricultural, domestic science, and industrial education programs in the high schools, and for the college-level preparation of teachers in these subjects. This funding leads to the creation of the Department of Agricultural Education and, subsequently, the School of Vocational Teaching.

Roots of Education

1876
Apr 17

Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas Established

The Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas is established in 1876 after the United States Congress approved the Morril Act in 1862. This act provided for donation of public land to the states for the purpose of funding higher education whose “leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and mechanic arts.”

1880
May 01

First Reported Aggie Teacher

F.F. Bledsoe, class of 1880, graduates from A&M College. He is the first former student to record his occupation as ‘teacher’ in the Association of Former Students’ directory.

1908
Jun 25

The “June Conference” begins

What is now known as the Administrative Leadership Institute begins as the “June Conference”. The annual week long conference is held on campus and brings together county superintendents, supervisors and city superintendents to discuss a variety of topics related to education.

1911
Sep 01

First courses in Agricultural Education taught

The first courses in Agricultural Education are taught within the Department of Horticulture by Edwin J. Kyle, Dean of the School of Agriculture and namesake of Kyle Field.

1913
Sep 01

First teacher certificate course

The first course leading to teacher certification is offered in the Department of Horticulture.

1917
Sep 01

The Department of Agricultural Education is established

E.J. Kyle, dean of the School of Agriculture, approves the creation of the Department of Agricultural Education. Prof. Martin Hayes serves as head.

1924
Sep 01

The School of Vocational Teaching is established

The School of Vocational Teaching is established as its own administrative entity with three departments: Agricultural Education, Industrial Education and Rural Education. 

Sep 01

Physical Education separates from Athletics

The Board of Directors separates Physical Education from Athletics and places it in the School of Arts and Sciences led by Dana X Bible. 

1936
May 01

The Department of Rural Education changes to the Department of Education

The School of Vocational Teaching is dismantled as an administrative unit due to lack of funding during the Great Depression. The school grants 364 degrees over a ten-year period. As a result, the Department of Rural Education is recreated as the Department of Education within the School of Arts and Sciences.

1937
Sep 01

W.L. Penberthy is named head of the Department of Health and Physical Education

Penberthy is selected as head of the Department of Health and Physical Education while also serving as Director of Intramural Sports. He is known affectionally as Mr. Penny amongst the students. According to the yearbook in 1944 he is ‘one of the best known and most popular men of the A&M Campus.’ Penberthy went on to make lasting improvements in physical education and intramural athletics. Today, the Texas A&M intramural fields bear his name.

Growth and Redefinition

Cadets training on campus

World War II brings significant changes on campus. Four hours of physical training are required of all A&M cadets. The Department of Physical Education helps prepare students for combat through physical training courses. Faculty and staff in the newly combined Department of Education and Psychology provide career and vocational counseling for students.

A different concept of education is acknowledged through the late 1940s and early 1950s. Administrators, faculty and state leaders begin to understand that producing qualified teachers for high schools leads to the production of better students to fill the departments of A&M College.

Using their G.I. Bill, many Veterans in education roles travel to campus in the summer to complete Master’s degrees. This leads to many institutions and boards of education to recognize the benefit of attaining graduate degrees for those serving in administrative capacities.

The early 1960s are a period of intense change across the nation and on campus. Beginning in 1963, women are finally allowed to enroll in limited numbers at A&M College. Many of these women are admitted to the Department of Education and Psychology to complete the required work for teacher certification. The next year Texas A&M is racially integrated expanding access to education for African American students in the state.

Two female students on campus before a football game.

As the student population grows, so do programs offered. The department is large enough that it takes over the fourth floor of the Academic Building. G. Rollie White Coliseum is built in 1964 and is heavily utilized by the Department of Health and Physical Education. Informal talk begins of creating a College of Education fueled by the steady growth of the student population and interest in education programs.

Growth and Redefinition

1944
Sep 01

Physical Education is required for cadets

Physical education is required of all students in preparing them to join the war effort. “The new program requires each student, unless he is physically unfit, to take four hours of organized P. E. and to participate in a minimum of one intramural game per week. The P. E. classes are divided into regular physical training groups and swimming groups.”

1945
Sep 01

Departments are combined

George B. Wilcox takes over the newly combined Department of Education and Psychology within the College of Arts and Sciences.

1946
May 01

A Bachelor of Science degree is approved in Health Education and Physical Education

 A Corrective Therapy option is offered in cooperation with the Veteran’s Hospital in Houston. Graduate courses are approved and a minor in Physical Education was approved.

Sep 01

Carl Tishler becomes head

Carl E. Tishler succeeds Penberthy as the head of the Department of Physical Education.

1950
Sep 01

A new program in Industrial Education

A new program is established in the Department of Industrial Education to prepare students for supervisory and management positions in business and industry. This program evolved into a B.S. in Industrial Technology and soon becomes the largest component in the department.

1954
Sep 01

Texas A&M Council on Teacher Education is formed

Its mission is to guide the four departments tasked with preparing teachers: Agricultural Education; Education and Psychology; Industrial Education; and Health and Physical Education.

1956
May 06

The Department of Education and Psychology is approved by the Texas Education Agency

The Department of Education and Psychology is officially approved by the Texas Education agency “to offer programs for the preparation of secondary school teachers in subject matter areas and for the qualification of administrators, counselors, principals, supervisors, and visiting teachers for provisional and professional certificates.”

1959
Jun 01

Frank Hubert is hired

Dr. Frank Hubert is selected as the new dean of the School of Arts and Sciences after seven years at the Texas Education Agency. Prior to this, Dr. Hubert was musical director for the Bengal Lancers and Bengal Guards in Orange, Texas. He also served as assistant principal and principal of Lutcher Stark Senior High School.

1960
Sep 01

Texas A&M joins AACTE

Texas A&M becomes an official member of the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education.

1961
Sep 01

First Doctor of Education program approved.

The Doctor of Education program is approved in Industrial Education. This is the first Doctor of Education approved by the Texas A&M Academic Council and the Coordinating Board for Higher Education of the State of Texas.

1963
Apr 27

Women are officially admitted to Texas A&M

Women are admitted to A&M on a limited basis. Many enroll in the Department of Education and Psychology to complete coursework towards teacher certification. This is a turning point for the university and for the birth of the College of Education.

Aug 23

The Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas officially becomes Texas A&M University

An act of the 58th Legislature of the State of Texas approves the name change of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas to Texas A&M University.

Sep 01

The College of Arts and Sciences is established

The School of Arts and Sciences becomes the College of Arts and Sciences.

1964
Jun 01

Texas A&M becomes racially integrated

1965
Sep 01

The Corps of Cadets is no longer compulsory for students

Students were no longer required to participate in the Corps of Cadets.

Sep 01

The College of Arts and Sciences becomes the College of Liberal Arts

The College of Arts and Sciences is separated into three new colleges; the College of Liberal Arts, College of Science, and College of Geosciences. The Department of Education and Psychology and Department of Health and Physical Education are housed within the College of Liberal Arts.

1966
May 01

The first Ph.D. in Education is awarded

The first Ph.D. in Education is awarded to Kamel M. Moghrabi. His dissertation topic is “An Analysis of Factors that Influence the Degree of Success or Failure of Foreign Students at Texas A&M University.”

1967
Jul 17

The department splits.

 The Coordinating Board approves the division of the Department of Education and Psychology to the Department of Education and Department of Psychology

Sep 01

The History of The Department of Education and Psychology is published

A Master’s thesis titled “The History of Education and Psychology at Texas A&M University” by Lorene Roby traces teacher education at A&M from 1913.

A New College

The catalyst for the formation of the College of Education is when Frank Hubert, then the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts, receives an offer from the University of Texas to join its faculty.

When he returns to A&M to speak to President Rudder about the offer, Rudder offers to create a new College of Education at Texas A&M.

Earl Rudder and Frank Hubert

Within 24 hours, Hubert presents him with a summary of what would be needed to create a college. The following day Rudder calls with his support to move forward.

In July, the Coordinating Board and the Texas A&M University System approves the creation of the College of Education. Frank Hubert is selected as Dean.

On September 1, the college officially opens its doors and includes the Departments of Educational Administration, Educational Curriculum and Instruction, Educational Psychology, Health and Physical Education, and Industrial Education. Agricultural Education is jointly administered by the College of Education and the College of Agriculture. In its first semester, the College of Education enrolls 1,307 students. This includes 694 graduate students and 613 undergraduate students.

Four years after its creation, the College of Education moves from the Academic Building to the tower of the M.T. Harrington Education Center named in honor of former student, president, and chancellor of the Texas A&M University System, M.T. Harrington. The $3.5 million facility provides classroom and office space for the Colleges of Education, Liberal Arts and Science.

In the 1970’s, the college focuses on developing a strong, cohesive college by recruiting faculty from major research universities across the nation and by building quality programs. College faculty and staff also begin researching innovations in technology and how it could be incorporated to improve education and health outcomes.

The strong foundation developed in the first decade created momentum for continued success. By the mid 70s, the college is established on campus as a leader both in the preparation of students and advancement of research. In 1977, the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education accredits every program in the college, even at the doctoral level.

A New College

1970
May 01

Harold Hawkins is named head of the Department of Educational Administration

Lester Richardson steps down as head of the Department of Educational Administration after serving for one year. Harold Hawkins is selected to replace him.

Sep 01

The college receives the Kindergarten Endorsement

The Department of Curriculum and Instruction develops, processes and wins approval by the Texas Coordinating Board for the first ‘Kindergarten Endorsement’ program in the State of Texas.

1971
Jun 09

The Center for Community Education is established

The Center for Community Education is funded by the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation and Texas A&M University. With this establishment, Texas A&M becomes a member of the network of 13 other University Centers nationwide aimed at fostering the Community Education Concept.

Sep 01

The Gifted and Talented program is established

The Gifted and Talented program is established in the Department of Educational Psychology.

1972
Sep 01

The Human Performance Laboratory is created

The Human Performance Laboratory is created in the Department of Health and Physical Education. The lab provides physical education majors with the practical experiences necessary to study the physiological, neurological, psychological, biomedical aspects of human motion, training and learning in work, sports and daily life.

1973
Sep 01

The Division of Interdisciplinary Education is established

The Division of Interdisciplinary Education is established as a home for graduate programs in Vocational Education, Adult Education and Extension Education. It eventually brings  national acclaim to the college and university from the American Council on Industrial Arts Education and U.S. News and World Report.

Sep 01

The School Psychology program begins

The college recruits its first School Psychology faculty member establishing the School Psychology program within the Department of Educational Psychology.

Sep 22

Harrington Tower is built

The College of Education moves from the Academic Building to the tower of the M.T. Harrington Education Center named in honor of former student, president, and chancellor of the Texas A&M University System, M.T. Harrington. The $3.5 million facility provides classroom and office space for the Colleges of Education, Liberal Arts and Science.

1974
May 09

Robert Schutes is named head of the Department of Education Curriculum and Instruction

Glenn Johnson steps down as head of the Department of Education Curriculum and Instruction. Robert Shutes replaces him.

1975
Sep 01

The Professional Senior Semester Program begins

 The Department of Curriculum and Instruction offers the Professional Senior Semester Program as a way to better prepare students for the first year of employment. Students are required to complete fifteen hours of professional development in addition to completing traditional student teaching.

1977
Sep 01

The Special Education program is created

The Texas Education Agency approves a Special Education program in the Department of Educational Psychology. There are 47 enrolled students both on campus and through extension programs

1978
Jun 27

The Counseling Psychology program receives accreditation

The Counseling Psychology program receives approval and accreditation from the American Psychological Association.

Sep 01

The Outdoor Education Institute is established

The Outdoor Education Institute is established in the Department of Health and Physical Education to develop team-building and leadership skills through involvement in outdoor and adventure-education activities for children and adults. The ChallengeWorks program continues this mission today. 

1979
May 01

Dan Householder is named head of the Department of Industrial Education

James Boone steps down as head of the Department of Industrial Education. Dan Householder replaces him.

May 01

Leonard D. Ponder is named head of the Department of Health and Physical Education

Carl Landiss retires and Leonard D. Ponder becomes head of the Department of Health and Physical Education.

May 01

Christopher Borman is named head of the Department of Educational Psychology

Arthur Roach steps down as head of the Department of Educational Psychology. Christopher Borman replaces him.

Sep 01

The Vocational Special Needs Library is established

Under the direction of Linda Parrish, the library is a resource to Texas vocational and special educators across the state.

Sep 01

The Galveston Island Adventure program begins

The Galveston Island Adventure program starts as a program within the Gifted and Talented Program.

Support for Inquiry

An advertisement for a new dean of the College of Education appears in the Chronicle of Higher Education that lists "evidence of innovativeness" as a required qualification. A copy of the ad appears mysteriously on the desk of Dr. Dean C. Corrigan, then dean of the College of Education at the University of Maryland.

Soon after, he receives a telephone invitation from Haskell Monroe, Dean of Faculties at Texas A&M, to visit the campus. Dean C. Corrigan became dean of the college in 1980. Corrigan keeps this ad folded in his wallet for many years afterward.

Under his leadership, the college revises its degree programs in response to the educational reform movements. Dean Corrigan challenges the faculty to form Centers of Inquiry within the college. Within these units, faculty work collaboratively to study policy and programs related to technological literacy; adult development; the role of educators in industry; multicultural and international education; and special needs programs related to aging, bilingual education, gifted and talented education, and individuals with disabilities.

With the creation of the Dean’s Development Council in 1982, new funding from corporate and private foundations gives an additional boost to college researchers to explore new ways to meet the challenges of the decade.

One of the charter members of the council and NASA Astronaut, Dick Scobee, helps fund an innovative scholar loan program which leads to the college becoming a leader in the state and nation for producing the most teachers for the fields of math and science.

Support for Inquiry

1980
Jun 01

Dean Corrigan is selected as Dean

Dean Corrigan is selected as the college’s second dean as Frank Hubert takes on a new role as Chancellor of the Texas A&M System. He began his educational career as a teacher in principal. Prior to serving as dean at Texas A&M, he was dean of the College of Education at the University of Maryland.

Sep 01

The Institute for the Gifted and Talented is established

The Institute for the Gifted and Talented is approved and established by the Texas A&M Board of Regents to conduct research on factors which inhibit or enhance the development of intellectual and creative abilities, operate summer enrichment programs for high ability children, and prepare educators in school programs for gifted and talented students.  .

Sep 01

The Department of Health and Physical Education begins operating the Fred A. Lennon Youth Camp

The Department of Health and Physical Education accepts responsibility for operating the Fred A. Lennon Youth Camp. This camp serves underprivileged youth and provided opportunities for faculty and students to gain practical experience with children from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Sep 01

Health and Physical Education moves into the Read Building

The Department of Health and Physical Education moves into the Read Building adjacent to Kyle Field. These facilities add over 90,000 square feet of new space and provides excellent space for exercise physiology, motor learning, and biomechanics laboratories.

1981
May 04

William Peters is named head of the Department of Educational Curriculum and Instruction

Robert Shutes steps down as head of the Department of Educational Curriculum and Instruction. William Peters replaces him.

Sep 01

The college receives its first endowed chair

The Omar Smith Chair of Health and Physical Education is established in the Department of Health and Physical Education.

1982
Feb 23

Charter members are selected for the Dean’s Development Council

25 people are selected to become charter members of the Dean’s Development Council for the College of Education. The council’s purpose is to assist the college in identifying and procuring resources to enhance areas of instruction, research and service.

1983
Aug 01

The Math/Science Scholar Loan program begins

Supported by NASA Astronaut and charter member of the Dean’s Development Council, Dick Scobee, the program offers scholar loans to undergraduate students willing to enter secondary mathematics and/or science teaching careers upon graduation. The program is highly successful and establishes Texas A&M as a leader in the nation for producing math and science teachers.

Sep 01

Grace Chisolm becomes full professor

Grace Chisolm becomes the first black woman to be named full professor at Texas A&M. She teaches in the Department of Educational Administration while also working with TAMU President Frank Vandiver on university-wide policies on equality.

Sep 01

All programs are reaccredited

The college is re-accredited by National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education.

1984
Apr 06

Artifacts from the college are brought up on the Challenger

Artifacts from the college gathered by students in the Math/Science Scholar Loan Program, are brought up in a space shuttle mission commanded by Dick Scobee.

May 01

Mike Ash is named head of the Department of Educational Psychology

Chris Borman steps down as head of the Department of Educational Psychology. Mike Ash replaces him.

Jul 09

The Principals’ Center is established

The Principals’ Center begins as a way to support Texas elementary and secondary school principals through training, assistance, and research. Professional development activities of the Center include the Summer Principals’ Academy, the Principalship Institute and other workshops and centers designed to meet specific needs of state principals. It becomes a Board of Regents approved in 1995.

Sep 01

Industrial Education expands

The Department of Industrial Education becomes the Department of Industrial, Vocational & Technical Education. The program itself is ranked fifth in the nation by U.S. News and World Report.

Sep 01

The Counseling and Assessment Clinic is established

The Counseling and Assessment Clinic is established to serve as a training and research facility for faculty and students in the Department of Educational Psychology in the areas of counseling psychology, school psychology, special education and psychological foundations of education.

1985
Sep 01

The Netum Steed Laboratory is built

The Netum Steed Laboratory is constructed as a strength and conditioning center for athletes. Significant research space is designated to the Physiology Research and Conditioning Laboratory in the Department of Health and Physical Education.

Nov 01

Center for Mathematics and Science Education is established

Collaborating with the College of Science, the college establishes the Center for Mathematics and Science Education to support Texas public educators teaching K-16 science and mathematics.

Champions for Diversity

Early in Corrigan's first term, Grace Chisolm, faculty in the Department of Educational Administration, becomes the first black woman to become full professor. Other faculty follow and programs are established within the college to support educational success for students from underrepresented populations thanks to the efforts of the Office of Minority Student Services and the Minority Mentorship Project.

Corrigan understood that the same importance of diversifying teachers in schools across the state should be placed on the A&M campus. The college needed to diversify its faculty in order to foster learning for all students.

The college is also focused on increasing its national reputation and visibility as well as external funding from foundations and government. The college makes Texas A&M history in 1991 by appointing its first female dean, Jane Stallings.

In response to state legislation passed in the 80s regarding education courses, the Department of Health and Physical Education changes its name to the Department of Health and Kinesiology. Motor learning is required of all undergraduate kinesiology majors for the first time and previously required coaching classes become elective. In health, community health became the dominant specialty of students.

Champions for Diversity

1986
Jan 28

The Challenger space shuttle is tragically destroyed

The Challenger space shuttle carrying the first teacher astronaut and artifacts from the College of Education tragically explodes killing all on board. Dick Scobee serves as the commander of the flight. An endowed scholarship is established in Commander Scobee’s honor.

Sep 01

The college joins the National Holmes Group

The College of Education becomes one of 96 members of the National Holmes Group. A committee of ten faculty members works to develop a complete teacher education curriculum in line with the Texas Holmes Group model which will meet the state requirements while also realizing an objective to develop career professional teachers.

Sep 01

The School Psychology program is accredited

The School Psychology program in the Department of Educational Psychology is accredited by the American Psychological Association.

Sep 01

#1 in the country for producing math and science teachers

The American Association of College for Teacher Education ranks the College of Education number one in the nation for producing math and science teachers.

1987
Jun 04

Minority Mentorship Program begins

Patricia Larke and  Donna Wiseman develop the Minority Mentorship Program where future teachers and current students share two-year mentoring relationships that prepare them to meet the challenges of teaching in Texas’ diverse classrooms.

Sep 01

New Bilingual Certification offered

The Department of Educational Curriculum and Instruction begins offering a bilingual education certification option within their program.

Sep 01

Bilingual Education becomes an approved certification option

The Department of Educational Curriculum and Instruction begins offering the bilingual education certification option within their program.

1988
Dec 01

Sylvia P. Fernandez completes a dissertation on the History of the College of Education

Sylvia P. Fernandez completes a dissertation titled “The College of Education at Texas A&M University, 1969 to 1988 – The Transition Years.” The dissertation traces the college from its earliest foundations to its 20-year milestone.

1989
Sep 01

The Texas Center for Adult Literacy and Learning is established

The Board of Regents approves and establishes the Texas Center for Adult Literacy and Learning at Texas A&M University. As the state literacy resource center, its purpose has evolved into responding to the needs of those who provide literacy services to Texas’ adult literacy and family literacy learners. The center operates today as the Texas Center for the Advancement of Literacy and Learning.

Sep 01

Thomas and Joan Read endow the Chair for Disadvantaged Youth

Thomas and Joan Read endow the Thomas A. and Joan Read Chair for Disadvantaged Youth. Leonard Ponder is honored as the first chair holder on September 1, 1990.

Dec 01

Corrigan leads education task force

In a continuing effort to combat the education crisis of the 80s, the Texas A&M Board of Regents creates a task force to carry out a “Committment to Education” program led by Dean Corrigan. Initiated by TAMU President William Mobley, the task force aims to link the university to public schools and the private sector to address growing drop-out rates, teacher shortages, illiteracy and a need for increased global awareness.

1990
May 01

James Kracht is named head of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction

William Peters steps down as head of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. James Kracht replaces him.

Jul 27

Jane Stallings is selected as dean

Jane A. Stallings is selected to be the next dean of the college. She becomes the first ever female dean at Texas A&M University.

Connecting with Communities

Jane Stallings’ reputation as a leader in educational research and the passionate culture of inquiry established by Dean Corrigan led the faculty to more than triple their research funding by the summer of 1992.

Whether through expertise in early childhood education, teacher preparation, health equity, adult literacy or school administration, the college enters the 90s in a unique position to affect change across the state and develop models for national scale.

A student teacher working with a young student.

Researchers establish programs to directly support schools and communities across the state as well as the individuals within them. Initiatives include the Accelerated Schools Collaborative Network, the Principals’ Center, the Center for Distance Learning Research and the Center for Alcohol and Drug Education.

Staff in the Principals' Center sitting at an informational table.

Jane Close Conoley becomes the fourth dean of the college in 1996. She is known for her ability to successfully collaborate and communicate across campus and beyond. She began her first term with goals to increase the college endowment, embrace and develop web-based graduate programs, and attract and retain high quality faculty and staff.

Connecting with Communities

1991
Jan 01

Stallings establishes the Dean’s Roundtable

Stallings establishes the Dean’s Roundtable to acknowledge and celebrate Texas educators.

May 01

The Department of Educational Human Resource Development is established

Donald Clark steps down as head of the Department of Industrial, Vocational and Technical Education. The department merges with the Adult and Continuing Education program and the Educational Human Resource Development program and becomes the Department of Educational Human Resource Development. Lloyd Korhonen replaces him as chair.

Oct 01

Ruth Harrington endows chair in Educational Leadership

The Ruth Harrington Chair in Educational Leadership is established. Dean Corrigan serves as the first chair holder.

1992
May 01

Bruce Thompson is named head of the Department of Educational Psychology

Mike Ash steps down as head of the Department of Educational Psychology. Bruce Thompson replaces him.

May 04

Yvonna Lincoln is named head of the Department of Educational Administration

David Erlandson steps down as head of the Department of Educational Administration. Yvonna Lincoln replaces him.

May 04

Robert Armstrong is named head of the Department of Health and Physical Education

Leonard Ponder steps down as head of the Department of Health and Physical Education. Robert Armstrong replaces him.

May 20

Faculty open the Accelerated Schools Collaborative Network

Faculty researchers, in collaboration with local school administrators, open the Accelerated Schools Collaborative Network in The Woodlands. The network aims to research the learning process of at-risk students. The Network provides training and support to Texas school and university faculty interested in developing Accelerated Schools.

Aug 28

The Texas Education Collaborative is developed

The college, through the leadership of  Jon Denton, is awarded a $1.9 million grant from the Texas Education Agency to support the Texas Education Collaborative which combines field experiences in school and community human service programs, advice and counsel from parents and technology to develop restructured professional preparation programs for tomorrow’s educators.

Sep 01

Interdisciplinary Education joins IVTE

Interdisciplinary Education joins with the Department of Industrial, Vocational & Technical Education and forms a newly created Educational Human Resource Development program in the Department of Educational Administration.

Sep 01

The college joins the Christopher Columbus Consortium

Along with Apple Computer, Inc. and Houston Independent School District, the college joined the nationwide Christopher Columbus Consortium to bridge the technological gap in the educational world. This project helped introduce education majors to programs and improvements for computer use in the classroom.

1993
Sep 01

The Office of Bilingual/ESL and Multicultural Education is created

From 1992 to 1994 the college saw a 2 percent increase in minorities enrolled. Coupled with a growing need for bilingual educators in Texas public schools, the Office of Bilingual/ESL and Multicultural Education is created to help prepare educators for the changing demographics of Texas classrooms.

1994
Jan 21

The Professional Development School opens in Bryan, Texas

Crockett Elementary in Bryan, Texas becomes the first Professional Development School as part of a new program in the college. 23 preservice teachers are enrolled to serve as substitutes to assist school faculty. The school faculty are released throughout the day to make contributions to the teacher education program.

Sep 01

The college becomes the 5th largest on campus

Enrollment in the college exceeds 3,700 students across five departments.

1995
Apr 01

The college begins a partnership with GTE

The college begins a partnership with GTE (now Verizon) to provide distance education programs through the Center for Distance Learning Research. The center was established as a business/education collaboration to provide educational, technical and practical opportunities to make interactive telecommunications a part of the learning/conferencing environment.

Jun 01

Bill Rupley is named head of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Bill Rupley is selected as the new head of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

Jun 10

Doug Palmer is named head of the Department of Educational Psychology

Doug Palmer is selected as the new head of the Department of Educational Psychology.

Sep 01

Learning to Teach in Inner City Schools program

The Learning to Teach in Inner City Schools program is established thanks to funding by the Houston Endowment, Inc. to provide students with teaching experience in the inner-city classrooms of Houston.

Sep 10

The Center for the Study of Implementation of Collaborative Learning Communities is established

The Center for the Study of Implementation of Collaborative Learning Communities is established in 1995. The center operates today as the Center for Urban School Partnerships.

1996
Sep 01

Chair in Math Education is established

The Curtis D. Robert Endowed Chair in Math Education is established.

Sep 01

Jane Close Conoley is selected as dean

Prior to Texas A&M, she served as associate dean for research and curriculum at Teachers College in the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Conoley is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and the Association of Psychological Science. She received her B.S. from the College of New Rochelle in 1969 and her Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Texas at Austin in 1976.

Shaping the Future

Under the continued leadership of Dean Conoley, the college significantly increases its endowment and makes technological and physical improvements to its facilities. The college is successful in recruiting more high-quality faculty and students from underrepresented populations than ever before.

On October 30, 1999, the college celebrates its 30th anniversary. During the celebration of the college, the “Shaping the Future” sculpture is unveiled in Harrington Plaza. The sculpture represents the impact teachers have in shaping and molding the lives of students and is the first on the A&M campus to feature a woman in a prominent role.

On September 26, 2002, the college is renamed to the College of Education and Human Development to reflect the full scope of academic programs and restructures to form four departments: Educational Psychology; Educational Administration and Human Resource Development; Health and Kinesiology; and Teaching, Learning and Culture.

Shaping the Future

1999
Sep 01

Distance Learning moves

The Distance Learning program moves to the Department of Educational Psychology.

Sep 01

The Institute of Sports Medicine and Human Performance is established

The Institute of Sports Medicine and Human Performance is established within the Department of Health and Kinesiology. It provides local, regional, statewide and national leadership in research and education in the broad areas of sports medicine and human performance.

Sep 01

The Sydney and J.L. Huffines ’44 Chair is established

The Sydney and J.L. Huffines ’44 Chair is established by the college in 1999.

Oct 30

Texas A&M unveils the Shaping the Future sculpture

The College celebrates its 30th anniversary. During the celebration of the college, the “Shaping the Future” sculpture is unveiled in Harrington Plaza. The sculpture represents the impact teachers have in shaping and molding the lives of students and is the first on the A&M campus to feature a woman in a prominent role.

2000
Apr 10

Jack Wilmore is named Texas A&M Distinguished Professor

Jack Wilmore is named Texas A&M Distinguished Professor. Later that year, he steps down as head of the Department of Health and Kinesiology.

May 01

The Center for Leadership in Higher Education is transferred to the Department of Educational Administration

Originally established by the System in 1994, the Center for Leadership in Higher Education is transferred to the Department of Educational Administration with the mission to promote, facilitate, and provide leadership for higher education in the state, nation and internationally through scholarly research, policy analysis, instruction, continuing education, and consultation.

Sep 01

Research funding hits $10 million

Faculty and staff surpass the long-standing strategic goal of attaining $10,000,000 in one year. Total external funding for the year was $12.5 million.

Sep 01

Bilingual Education moves to Educational Psychology

Under the direction of Rafael Lara-Alecio, the Bilingual Education program moves to the Department of Educational Psychology.

Sep 01

The college receives an endowment to establish two chairs in Urban Education

The college receives a $3 million endowment to establish two chairs in Urban Education from the Houston Endowment Inc. to support undergraduate and graduate scholarships, special centers, and faculty to provide quality teachers and administrators for the greater Houston area.

2001
Apr 02

Yvonna Lincoln is named Texas A&M Distinguished Professor

Dr. Yvonna Lincoln is named Distinguished Professor in 2001.

Sep 01

aggieTEACH begins

Collaborating with the College of Science, the aggieTEACH program begins as a way to meet the rising demand for highly-qualified secondary mathematics and science teachers in Texas and the nation.

Sep 03

The Leonard D. Ponder Chair in Health and Kinesiology is established

In 2001, the college established the Leonard D. Ponder Chair in Health and Kinesiology.

2002
Jun 03

Steve Dorman is named head of the Department of Health and Kinesiology

Dr. Steve Dorman is selected as the new head of the Department of Health and Kinesiology in 2002.

Jul 25

The Institute for Applied Creativity is established

The Institute for Applied Creativity is established in the Department of Educational Psychology. This institute is transferred to the College of Architecture in 2010.

Sep 01

Reads and Counts transfers to the college

The largest single-campus math and reading tutoring program for elementary-aged children and their families in the United States, Reads and Counts, is transferred to the college from the Financial Aid Office.

Sep 26

The college is renamed College of Education and Human Development

The Board of Regents approves the request to formally change the name of the college to the College of Education and Human Development.

2003
Mar 26

The Center for the Study of Health Disparities is established

The Board of Regents approves the creation of the Center for the Study of Health Disparities in the Department of Health and Kinesiology.

May 01

Bryan Cole steps down as head of the Department of Educational Administration

In 2003, Dr. Bryan Cole steps down as the head of the Department of Educational Administration.

May 01

Doug Palmer steps down as the head of the Department of Educational Psychology

In 2003, Dr. Doug Palmer steps down as the head of the Department of Educational Psychology.

May 01

Dennie Smith is named head of the Department of Teaching, Learning and Culture

John Helfeldts steps down as head of the Department of Teaching, Learning and Culture. Dennie Smith replaces him.

Jun 06

The Sydney and J.L. Huffines Institute for Sports Medicine and Human Performance is officially named

The Sydney and J.L. Huffines Institute for Sports Medicine and Human Performance is officially named, dedicated and approved by the TAMU Board of Regents.

Sep 01

Carolyn and Tommie Lohman establish the Lohman Learning Communities

Participating freshman take classes together, including an education course designed to help them determine if teaching is the correct career choice for them.

Nov 10

The Center for Sport Management Research and Education is established

The Center for Sport Management Research and Education is established in late 2003.